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Arts and Culture Alliance of Chatham County

Arts and Culture Alliance of Chatham County

Featured News

  • Celebrate Arts and Humanities Month!
    October is National Arts & Humanities Month (NAHM)—a coast-to-coast collective recognition of the importance of culture in America. NAHM was launched by Americans for the Arts more than 30 years ago as National Arts Week in honor of the twentieth anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Celebrate Arts and Humanities Month!
    October is National Arts & Humanities Month (NAHM)—a coast-to-coast collective recognition of the importance of culture in America. NAHM was launched by Americans for the Arts more than 30 years ago as National Arts Week in honor of the twentieth anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1993, it was reestablished by Americans for the Arts and national arts partners as a month-long celebration, with goals of: FOCUSING on equitable access to the arts at local, state, and national levels;ENCOURAGING individuals, organizations, and diverse communities to participate in the arts;ALLOWING governments and businesses to show their support of the arts; andRAISING public awareness about the role the arts and humanities play in our communities and lives. The arts and humanities have played a critically important role in getting us through the COVID-19 pandemic and in amplifying the need for racial equity across the country. National Arts & Humanities Month is the time for communities to come together in unified celebration of the power of the arts to make a difference and change our lives for the better. SEPTEMBER 30, 2021 As our Nation continues to grapple with consequential crises — from combating the ongoing global pandemic and addressing cries for racial justice to tackling the existential threat that climate change poses to our planet — the arts and humanities enable us to both understand our experiences and lift our sights. During this National Arts and Humanities Month, we celebrate the power of the arts and humanities to provide solace, understanding, and healing. We recognize the ability of the arts and humanities to amplify important and diverse voices and messages. We reflect on the fact that, as we have struggled with isolation, anxiety, and the loss of loved ones, we have turned to music and dance, literature and poetry, and philosophy and history to bring us together and help us persevere through, and grapple with, our current moment. From our Nation’s earliest days, we have recognized the arts as a foundation of our Republic.  As George Washington wrote in 1781, “The arts and sciences [are] essential to the prosperity of the State and to the ornament and happiness of human life.”  Today, any American — regardless of their background — can create art and turn to it for hope, acceptance, and inspiration.  The arts and humanities have united us as a Nation — from the television programs we watch to the books and exhibits that inspire us — providing a sense of community when we need it most.   The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated our creative sectors.  Before the pandemic, our Nation’s arts and culture sectors were strong and vibrant — a nearly $1 trillion industry employing over 5 million Americans.  But as the pandemic canceled events and closed theatres, concert halls, and performance venues, the unemployment rates for the cultural community spiked to among the highest in the Nation.  Many museums, libraries, and arts venues closed their curtains and doors, some for a final time.  For our Nation to fully recover and heal, we need the creative economy and our cultural sector to recover. My Administration recognizes the essential role the arts and humanities play in our Nation’s economy, democracy, health, and vitality and is committed to supporting the arts community.  That is why my American Rescue Plan added another $1.25 billion in funding for the Shuttered Venues Operators Grant through the Small Business Administration, for a total of $16.25 billion.  This critical program continues to provide much-needed relief to music and arts venues.  My American Rescue Plan also provided an additional $135 million each for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and $200 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).  My proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2022 also includes significant funding increases for the NEA, NEH, and IMLS.  Collectively, these funds will help put people back to work and support our Nation’s creators. The arts can educate.  To build vaccine confidence and communicate the benefits of vaccination in creative and culturally relevant ways, my Administration has partnered with artists and cultural icons to encourage Americans of all ages and from all corners of our Nation to get vaccinated.  In this way, the arts can help us put an end to COVID-19.  Thanks to the progress we are making with people getting vaccinated, tens of millions of Americans can go back to plays, concerts, and the movies.  The arts can also heal Americans, from those who have suffered the traumas of loss or isolation during the pandemic to veterans and service members returning from war. The pandemic has further revealed to us deep and unacceptable inequities in health care, education, and justice.  The arts and humanities reveal the depths of these inequities and help us have the conversations and address the challenges that can be difficult to confront.  The arts help us express and process our hurt and outrage as well as our joy and wonder — to better understand the experiences of our neighbors.  By supporting and showcasing the creativity and experiences of those that have too often been discounted, we can advance our realization of a society that prioritizes equity and empathy. This October, as we celebrate National Arts and Humanities Month, let us turn to the arts and humanities as a way to help America heal and grow.  Let us build back better by ensuring that our cultural workers and creators are back at work and thriving.  Let us ensure that everyone in America — regardless of race, geography, ability, and socioeconomic status — has equal and unrestricted access to the arts and humanities, and the opportunities they afford. NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2021 as National Arts and Humanities Month.  I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-sixth.              JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR. Get Involved! Whether you’ve participated before or want to get involved for the first time, we have lots of ideas to help you celebrate. Here are some easy ways to promote National Arts & Humanities Month in your community this October. We have samples, graphics, images, and several other items to help you with this celebration. Some ideas are: Join the 31-day Instagram challenge and encourage others to join, too!Request a proclamation.Use the toolkit to advocate for the National Endowment for the Art.Get the word out to the media through press releases or events.
  • Arts and Economic Prosperity in Georgia
    Georgians for the Arts is seeking partners throughout the State of Georgia to help with the Arts and Economic Prosperity 6 (AEP6) research project led by Americans for the Arts. As a partner with Georgians for the Arts, research fees are discounted by up to 50% off independent research reports. Arts advocates know the arts provide numerous benefits, however, the economic impact of the arts resonates best with policymakers and the budgets they control. To that end, every arts advocate should have the best economic research available to make the case for better public policy. Our goal is …
  • State Tax Refund Contributions To GCA
      On March 23, 2021, the Georgia House of Representatives submitted for the 2022-23 Georgia legislative session H.R. 821 providing Georgia taxpayers the option to donate their tax refund to support Georgia Council for the Arts. Current contribution options include Georgia Wildlife Conservation Fund, Georgia Fund for Children and Elderly, Georgia Cancer Research Fund, Georgia Land Conservation Program, Georgia National Guard Foundation, Dog & Cat Sterilization Fund, Saving the Cure Fund, Realizing Educational Achievement Can Happen Program, Public Safety Memorial Grant. Contact your Georgia State Representative and let them know you want them to sign on as a …
  • 2021 GA Economic Impact Fact Sheet Recently Released
    Share the 2021 Fact Sheet with your supports and government representatives and show them the arts mean business. This post was originally published on this site

Other ACACC News and Updates

  • Amphitheater at Tom Triplett Park
    Chatham County is building an amphitheater! Chatham County is designing, installing, and operating its first outdoor amphitheater scheduled to open in 2023. It is early in the design process, but the amphitheater and surrounding area are expected to have a parking capacity of 300, with an additional 200 nearby, and an audience capacity of 900-1,500. …
  • Meet Jason Buelterman, Chatham County Commission Chairman Candidate
    Following up to the Sunday, November 1 Savannah Morning News’ ‘Jason Buelterman aims to build ‘good relationships’ in his run for Chatham Commission chair, Jason was asked to respond to his vision of how arts and culture should be positioned in Chatham County.  In response, he shared: If elected as Chairman, what role do you …
  • Meet Chester Ellis, Chatham County Commission Chairman Candidate
    Following up to the Sunday, November 1 Savannah Morning News’ ‘Community pastor’ Chester Ellis shares the story behind his bid for Chatham Commission chair, Chester was asked to respond to his vision of how arts and culture should be positioned in Chatham County.  In response, he shared: I fully support the Chatham county arts community. …
  • Meeting with Chatham County’s Legislative Delegation
    In advance of the State of Georgia’s legislative open session, the Arts and Culture Alliance of Chatham County and Georgians for the Arts met with the delegation to present some “ask” to help advance or further the arts and culture within the State.  In addition to a number of back up materials originating from Americans …
  • Arts policy plays role in election
    The election cycle brought an increased number of opportunities for candidates to share their vision, accomplishment, priorities, and platforms.  This year for the first time, voters had the chance to hear from candidates and their arts and culture platform. Given the platforms and the outcomes of the election, one could construe perhaps a close correlation. …
  • 2019 Arts and Culture Candidate Questionnaire
    Through a collaborative effort between Rob Hessler, Executive Director, Bigger Pie Arts Advocacy, Kristopher Monroe, Vice-Chair Savannah-Chatham Historic Site & Monument Commission, Gretchen Hilmers, Social Media Coordinator, ARC Savannah, and Peter Roberts, Location Gallery, the Arts and Culture Alliance of Chatham County is pleased to provide you the Arts and Culture Candidate Questionnaire Responses for the 2019 …
  • Georgia’s Arts Funding Pathetic
    Referring to the Editorial of July 10, I must disagree with the notion about Georgians paying close attention to national rankings, such as child and family well-being featured in the article. It seemed that few noticed the State of Georgia ranking last in per capita arts funding.  Georgia was 50 out of 50 when the …
  • February 2018 Update
    It has been awhile since the last communication, but the time is overdue to update you on recent activities and to get the wheels moving again to advance the arts and culture industry in Chatham County. Advisory Council Wanted In short, ACACC needs to assemble an advisory council.  There are activities to plan for the …
  • Funding non-profits is good business
    Following up to Kristopher Monroe’s article Savannah Chatham budgets must reflect community’s cultural values, and after the City’s budget has been adopted, I believe it prudent to see the conversation steered away from intrinsic cultural values to government’s role in job development and economic impact regardless of the business model.  There should be no discounting …

From Georgians for the Arts

  • ArtsCity Festival – A Mini-Arts in the Heart on September 17-19, 2021
    ArtsCity Festival is a mini version of the popular Arts in the Heart Festival and will be held on September 17, 18, 19, 2021 in Augusta, GA.ArtsCity Festival will still offer great music on two stages, over 80 juried fine artists booths and ten international food booths with authentic cuisine by our local cultural groups. …
  • Conyers Cherry Blossom Festival (March 27 & 28)
    This weekend marks the 40th Anniversary of the award-winning Conyers Cherry Blossom Festival presented by Ingles Market. The “40 and fabulous” themed festival will take place on Saturday and Sunday, March 27 and 28, 2021 at the Georgia International Horse Park..The Conyers Cherry Blossom Festival is one of the largest …
  • National Arts Action Summit April 4-9, 2021
    Still considering whether or not you should attend the virtual 2021 National Arts Action Summit, the largest national arts advocacy collaboration? Here are five reasons why you should register today: Thanks to the continued commitment from this year’s organizational partners—and in response to the financial challenges that many are facing …
  • “Celebrating Georgia’s Creative Talents” Art Competition
    On January 13, 2021, Georgians for the Arts will open up state-wide registration for the art competition “Celebrating Georgia’s Creative Talents.” All Georgia-based artists may submit in the area of visual arts, literary, video, and music. Select artists will have artwork featured in Georgia’s Arts Advocacy Week online magazine, a …
  • 2021 Annual Georgia Arts Action Summit & Arts Advocacy Week
    Georgians for the Arts presents the 2021 Georgia Arts Action Summit, which will be held virtually Sunday, February 7 and Monday, February 8, 2021, is a two-day digital event bringing together arts advocates from every corner of the State of Georgia.   The event provides grassroots arts advocates training led by …
  • Senator Kelly Loeffler / Voting Record
    The Arts Action Fund’s Congressional Arts Report Card is a one-stop guide to help you make informed decisions at the ballot box. We’ve used metrics and analysis based on previous congression voting records, sponsorship of key arts legislation, and participation in the cultural caucuses.

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